Annual Report 2013/14

by Kjetil Thorsen, Snøhetta
Geschäftsbericht 2013/14 von Kjetil Thorsen, Snøhetta
Snohetta_2014_Text
LIVING THE NORDIC LIGHT by Kjetil Thorsen, Snøhetta
With Kjetil Thorsen, Founding Partner of Snøhetta, Oslo, an internationally renowned architect agreed to design this year’s annual report. Under the heading of LIVING THE NORDIC LIGHT, the creative team at Snøhetta has taken the Zumtobel Group’s series of artistic annual reports into its 23rd year with a very special take on the fascination of natural light.

In this report, we invite you to discover the phenomenon of light in the Arctic Circle, with its never-ending summer days and long winter nights, all the way to the mysterious northern lights. NORDIC LIGHT shapes the people on the northern fringe of Europe, their culture and their symbiotic relationship with nature. Consequently, as they lead us on an exciting voyage of discovery, Kjetil Thorsen and the Snøhetta team keep the spotlight firmly on people in the Arctic Circle.
Centenarians Looking Back
"We captured elements of the history described by four people who have lived longer that most." . . . Kjetil Thorsen.
Olaug Bastholm, 70°51’28”N, 29°5’5”E, born 6 February 1914 | Copyright Sølve Sundsbø
Olaug Bastholm, 70°51’28”N, 29°5’5”E, born 6 February 1914 | Copyright Sølve Sundsbø
Taunting the sea

. . . “It got dark quickly in the autumn. A blue light came. Sometimes it was green, purple. The Northern Lights. Sometimes it shot an arm out. It stuck out its tongue. It wanted to capture us.” Olaug grew up with the folk wisdom that the Northern Lights were dangerous. You weren’t supposed to wave at them — at least not with anything white. But they did it anyway — of course. The sea must be taunted; the Northern Lights must be challenged. Life has to be played . . .

Abstract of the Annual Report

Snohetta_Portrait_Marie
Marie Gulbrandsen, 69°8’48”N, 18°9’22”E, born 30 September 1912 | Copyright Sølve Sundsbø
Marie Gulbrandsen, 69°8’48”N, 18°9’22”E, born 30 September 1912 | Copyright Sølve Sundsbø
Separating light from darkness

. . . When winter was on the wane, rays of sunlight began to creep over the horizon. One could sense the sun’s presence even if one couldn’t see it. The children sat every day on the kitchen windowsill and waited. They stared at the clearing between the Børringen and Gompen mountains. That was where the sun always showed itself first. “There! There she comes!” they would cry in unison upon glimpsing a bit of the yellow disc. “Thank God,” sighed their mother. “Thank God the sun came back again.” And then they all greeted the sun. For there was nothing dangerous about waving at the sun. She didn’t lure you likethe Northern Lights, didn’t cast a spell. She just gave generously of herself — longed-for light, blessed warmth . . .

Abstract of the Annual Report
Snohetta_Portrait_Apmut
Apmut Ivar Kuoljok, 66°37’0”N, 19°50’0”E, born 22 March 1928 | Copyright Sølve Sundsbø
Apmut Ivar Kuoljok, 66°37’0”N, 19°50’0”E, born 22 March 1928 | Copyright Sølve Sundsbø

Old School Reindeer Herders

. . . Apmut Ivar Kuoljok is as old as modernity and electrification, and has lived a reindeer herder’s life during the most eventful years of Sami history. His family’s stories lived in darkness. In the absence of light and modern transportation, a narrative form grew that Apmut Ivar still carries on. “We talked and told stories in the evening in the goahti. That was all there was. And when we came to the villages, or to Jokkmokk, we always sought one another out to hear the news. Whenever somebody arrived, people flocked around him to hear what he had to say. Now I can see my neighbour through the window while I’m watching TV, but we don’t talk to each other. That’s why I have to write. I’m afraid the stories will disappear forever otherwise. They’re not just tall tales; they’re full of knowledge. How do you tame a reindeer gelding? How do you dry meat? How do you find pasturage when winter is coming?” . . .

Abstract of the Annual Report

Snohetta, Portrait_Helny
Helny Zingmark, 65°50’0”N, 21°43’0”E, born 28 July 1913 | Copyright Sølve Sundsbø
Helny Zingmark, 65°50’0”N, 21°43’0”E, born 28 July 1913 | Copyright Sølve Sundsbø
Biking round the Baltic between the World Wars

. . . “When the electricity came, we grew apart. The circles of candles disappeared. We could go our own way; the house got bigger.” When her childhood years were over, Helny Zingmark took a position at a farm in Malung, where, you will recall, the lady of the house was so unbearably haughty. Helny was so unhappy that she ran off and hopped a moving freight train to get away. “The wind blew something fierce, but I held on tight. Then they discovered me, and I was going to be arrested and have to pay a fine and what have you. However, somebody I knew managed to get me out of the situation, and I was allowed to get off at Lima and go home to the farm. It was after that that I headed out on my bicycle.” . . .

 

Abstract of the Annual Report

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