Annual Report 2014/15

by James Turrell
Annual Report 2014/15 by James Turrell
EXTRAORDINARY IDEAS - REALIZED by James Turrell
Under the heading of “Extraordinary Ideas – Realized” the Zumtobel Group’s 24th artistic annual report has now been published. Designed by James Turrell, the report features key installations by the artist from all periods of his oeuvre, accompanied by essays and dialogues by and with some of Turrell’s prominent contemporaries and companions.

Together with an extensive photographic documentation of James Turrell’s installations, contributions from experts in the fields of astronomy, physics, art history and medicine underline the diversity and depth of the artist’s work. The Zumtobel Group annual report is the first to feature images of Turrell’s latest Skyspaces in Japan and Tasmania, as well as including previously unpublished material on his earlier works.

Commenting on his own approach to light art, James Turrell says: “Light is a powerful substance. We have a primal connection to it. But, for something so powerful, situations for its felt presence are fragile. I form it as much as the material allows. I like to work with it so that you feel it physically, so you feel the presence of light inhabiting a space.”

With few exceptions the photographs of the lighting installations in the annual report are by Munich-based photographer Florian Holzherr, who for the past 18 years and more has been documenting Turrell’s works, suffused with light and of intense colour. The graphic concept behind the annual report is the work of Lorraine Wild of Green Dragon Office in Los Angeles.
SKYSPACE Amarna in Tasmania, Australia
© Florian Holzherr | © James Turrell
© Florian Holzherr | © James Turrell
Skyspace Amarna, Tasmania
Skyspace Amarna, Tasmania
    © Florian Holzherr | © James Turrell
    Skyspace Amarna, Tasmania
    Skyspace Amarna, Tasmania
      © Florian Holzherr | © James Turrell
      Skyspace Amarna, Tasmania
      Skyspace Amarna, Tasmania
        © Florian Holzherr | © James Turrell
        Skyspace Amarna, Tasmania
        Skyspace Amarna, Tasmania
          © Florian Holzherr | © James Turrell
          Skyspace Amarna, Tasmania
          Skyspace Amarna, Tasmania
            © Florian Holzherr | © James Turrell
            Skyspace Amarna, Tasmania
            Skyspace Amarna, Tasmania
              Skyspace_Amarna_Tasmanien
              SKYSPACE Amarna, 2015, Museum of Old and New Art, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia

              Turrell’s work on Skyspaces began in the 1970s and today there are 75 public sites around the globe. A Skyspace is basically space with seats along the walls and a large aperture in the roof. Owing to the narrow rim of this opening, the visible section of sky appears to be flush with the roof, eliminating the distinction between inside and out. As the sky shifts through different shades of color over the course of the day, particularly at dawn and dusk, the ever-changing aperture may appear matte or transparent, monochrome or brightly colored. Many of the Skyspaces are located in California, in San Francisco and Los Angeles, while others are in Europe and Asia. One of the most spectacular is a pyramid in the jungle on the Yucatán Peninsula. In 2013 Turrell transformed the entire rotunda at the Guggenheim Museum in New York into one of his most memorable Skylight installations.
              GB_2014_15_Extravagance_of_thoughts
              The Extravagance of Thought
              A conversation between James Turrell and E.C. Krupp © Philipp Scholz Rittermann | © James Turrell
              A conversation between James Turrell and E.C. Krupp © Philipp Scholz Rittermann | © James Turrell
               
              James Turrell and astronomer E. C. Krupp, longtime director of the Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles, have known each other since their student days at Pomona College in Claremont, California. They recently got together at their former university to talk about old times and new projects.

              Turrell " . . . Some of my most amazing experiences have occurred when I’m flying. If you fly over to Europe, you usually arrive in the early morning. So you fly through a sunrise. Sometimes when you look out your window instead of sleeping the whole time, you can see amazing events. And that really influenced me a lot. The thing about light is, it not only reveals, it obscures. You’re unable to see through the light that’s in the atmosphere . . . "
              GB_2014_15_Skyspace_Japan
              SKYSPACE House of Light in Japan
              © Florian Holzherr | © James Turrell
              © Florian Holzherr | © James Turrell
               
              SKYSPACE House of Light, 1998 – 2000, Niigata Prefecture, Japan

               

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